Gender Dysphoria

a term to replace the outdated diagnosis of Gender Identity Disorder, along with the stigma GID imposes on transgender people as disordered. Gender Dysphoria does away with the implication that transgender people are mentally ill.

“Based on the standards to be set by the DSM-V, individuals will be diagnosed with Gender Dysphoria for displaying ‘a marked incongruence between one’s experienced/expressed gender and assigned gender,'” (Beredjick).

“The newest edition of the psychiatric diagnostic manual will do away with labeling transgender people as ‘disordered’,” (Beredjick).

transsexual

a person who has the desire to go through the process of transitioning to another gender via hormones and/or genital surgery.

The term was made popular in the 1950’s by Dr. Harry Benjamin. The word transsexual “refers to people who feel a strong desire to change their sexual morphology,” (Stryker, 18).

genderqueer

used to describe a person who does not abide to gender norms.

The word “queer” was reclaimed in the early 1990’s; it had previously been used as a derogatory word for homosexuality. Although queer is often associated with sexuality, it is also used to describe gender-variance as well. “‘Queer’ was less a sexual orientation than it was a political one,” (Stryker, 20).

gender role

social expectations associated with gender.

A typical heteronormative gender role is the idea that men should have a job outside of the home and a women should stay at home with their children. This gender role is slightly outdated but still affects ideas about gender today in the United States. “Gender roles tell us that if we don’t perform the prescribed expectations, we are failing to be proper women or men,”  (Stryker, 12).

635940263255636955-676010678_sex-education-gender-stereotypes

gender identity

a person’s sense of themself as a specific gender (e.g. man, woman, neither, or both).

Typically, people have a sense of agreement between their gender identity and the gender they were assigned at birth. It is possible for there to be a disagreement between one’s sex and gender identity, and if this is the case the person is considered to be transgender. “One’s gender identity could perhaps best be described as how one feels about being referred to by a particular pronoun,” (Stryker, 13).