Gender Identity Disorder (GID)

an outdated formal medical diagnosis for “feelings of unhappiness or distress about the incongruence between the  gender-signifying parts of one’s body, one’s gender identity, and one’s social gender,” (Stryker, 13). See Gender Dysphoria.

Advertisements

gender identity

a person’s sense of themself as a specific gender (e.g. man, woman, neither, or both).

Typically, people have a sense of agreement between their gender identity and the gender they were assigned at birth. It is possible for there to be a disagreement between one’s sex and gender identity, and if this is the case the person is considered to be transgender. “One’s gender identity could perhaps best be described as how one feels about being referred to by a particular pronoun,” (Stryker, 13).

gender

a socially constructed definition of men and women.

Gender is considered cultural, where sex is biological. The words ‘man’ and ‘woman’ are used to describe gender.  “The social organization of different kinds of bodies into different categories of people,” (Stryker, 11).

feminist transphobia

a radical feminist view starting in the early 1970’s that trans women are not actual women, but men using their male privilege to infiltrate women’s spaces.

Some feminists thought that trans women were parodying actual women and “leeching off women,” (Stryker, 101). Trans women were often not welcomed to participate in feminist conferences and organizations during this time. 

queer

 

  • Throughout historical time, “queer” has changed its meaning, yet always have referred to people, places, or things that are considered to be the opposite of the societal norm. Originally “queer” was used to describe something as “odd,” “strange,” or “quaint.” In the early 18th century, the term “queer” meant something was “bad” or worthless (Bronski, xvii).
  • Later on in the 1920’s, “queer” was negatively used as an expression for homosexuals. Today, some LGBTQIAPK communities have politically reclaimed “queer” to challenge the heteronormative mainstream culture (Bronski, xvii). 
  • Queer is an umbrella term that includes all sexual and gender identities within the LGBTQIAPK (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans, Queer, Intersex, Asexual, Pansexual, Kink) community (Serrano, 3).  

berdache

Berdache is an incorrect name used by the French explorers and referred to indigenous men and women that behaved and dressed like the opposite sex.  However, these “third sex” roles were widely respected amongst their own indigenous community, and often times implied an elevated, respected, and religious positions within their culture, such as shamans (Bronski, 3).