transsexual

a person who has the desire to go through the process of transitioning to another gender via hormones and/or genital surgery.

The term was made popular in the 1950’s by Dr. Harry Benjamin. The word transsexual “refers to people who feel a strong desire to change their sexual morphology,” (Stryker, 18).

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sex change

the medical process of surgically change someone’s genitals to those of the opposite sex.

The first accessible sex changes for Americans were brought about in the mid-1960’s during the “Big Science” period of transgender history in the United States. (Stryker, 94)

queer

 

  • Throughout historical time, “queer” has changed its meaning, yet always have referred to people, places, or things that are considered to be the opposite of the societal norm. Originally “queer” was used to describe something as “odd,” “strange,” or “quaint.” In the early 18th century, the term “queer” meant something was “bad” or worthless (Bronski, xvii).
  • Later on in the 1920’s, “queer” was negatively used as an expression for homosexuals. Today, some LGBTQIAPK communities have politically reclaimed “queer” to challenge the heteronormative mainstream culture (Bronski, xvii). 
  • Queer is an umbrella term that includes all sexual and gender identities within the LGBTQIAPK (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans, Queer, Intersex, Asexual, Pansexual, Kink) community (Serrano, 3).  

sexuality

Sexuality is a historical and theoretical identity category, expressed similarly and differently, throughout sexual systems within particular moments of time.

Sexuality is not a natural fact, rather a cultural and historical production that is imposed onto the body according to ideological discourse (Halperin, 416).

Sexuality is “what we find erotic and how we take pleasure in our bodies” (Stryker, 16). 

Sexuality is an endless intersecting “constellation of factors” that culturally inform people their understanding about sexual intimacy, desires, and activity. Bronski uses the terminology of sexuality to connect the past with the present, in order to comprehend the relationship between both (Bronski, xviii).